Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Simple Watchman's Cap

I am rarely asked to knit for other people.  It is even rarer that I know the recipient will actually use what I knit for them.  And rarer than that I agree to do it.  There've just been too many unused, donated, trashed, or ripped out (?) gifts for me to waste my time on that.


This hat is the rare kind.  I knit one for my grandfather over ten years ago, but he never wore it because he liked to make a big fold in the brim of his hats when he walked in the winter and I think he felt like it was too small to do that comfortably.  Also, you know how wool/acrylic blends can have little give and kind of inch their way up and off of your head?  Of course, he never told me this, he just laid it on the shelf in his closet with his other hats because it still mattered to him that I made it for him.  Later, my uncle inherited it.  He found it perfect because he didn't roll his beanies and would never have remembered to hand wash a 100% wool hat.  It had the perfect hipster fit for him.

Last year, he asked if I would knit him another one in black.  This is a knit-worthiness moment, guys.  I planned to make it for him for Christmas.  I was going to see him shortly afterward and bring it to him, but my gauge got weird and it looked like something Dumb Donald would be embarrassed to wear.  I planned to immediately re-knit it but he was in and out of the hospital, soccer season started, my son graduated...  Long story, short: I finally finished it... 6 months later, then mailed it... a few weeks later.  I know.  I'm the worst.

(Look!  no eye holes!  See more on Ravelry, Kollabora, Instagram, and Flickr

Details:  I used the exact same pattern as before: Channah Koppel's Ribbed Watchman's Hat and the same yarn, Lion Brand Wool-Ease, since he liked the fit so much.  This time I used worsted instead of two strands of sport held together.  It felt wrong to buy an acrylic blend for a Christmas gift.  I knew it would be most appreciated, but I still felt dirty when I left Joann.

The whole thing knit up in about two days worth of knitting time.  If I were to make another one for myself or a family member I actually lived with, I would go with real wool.  But unless I'm here to offer to wash it for someone, it needs to be washer and dryer safe.

Basic, inexpensive, and relaxing to work on, and very appreciated- not much more to say about it.

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Honk if you like knitting.

What's the deal with all the walk-knitting talk?  It stems from a recent commitment I made to move more, combined with Cassondra Rizzardi's Mystery Knit-along called Walk The Block MKAL.  That KAL began at just the right time to add motivation to my movement endeavor.



This commitment isn't to "exercise daily" or even to walk, necessarily.  I have always enjoyed getting out for a walk with the dogs in the evening or going on runs, but this is about moving more in between all of that stuff.  A couple of years ago, I learned how important it is to not sit for long periods of time after I injured myself lifting and flinging 50 pound bags of soil (a new 4-H/ crossfit  hybrid class).  The injury wasn't terrible, but it was followed by a time in my life of great stress and lots of driving and sitting around and waiting.  It created a deep pain in my hip that became almost unbearable.


After my grandfather passed away and my grandmother's affairs seemed settled enough, I took 8 weeks to recover from it.  This involved seeing my chiropractor, not riding in a car unless I had to (something about the tilt of the seat really irritated it) and rarely sat on the couch.  That's what it took to overcome what began as a simple pull but was facilitated, by sedentarism, into a full blown ordeal.  And chiropractic isn't cheap.  It is insane how busy a person can be while still being sedentary.


I've been reading Move Your DNA, by Katy Bowman, a book that has cemented my understanding of what happened to my body during that stressful time.  Since I began the book, I started sitting on the floor, whenever  I do sit.  She has this great illustration done by an anthropologist of all the ways he had seen various people sit.  It gave me the idea to vary my positioning every few minutes.  I'm also stretching a lot while sitting and knitting on the floor.  You ask if it's helping? Well, I had really tight adductors in one leg since that aforementioned injury.  After two weeks of floor sitting and stretching only when I knit, I can almost do the splits again.  And the muscles of both legs seem equally relaxed.  No, I don't do the splits while knitting.  That would just be weird.

Look, if it weren't for knitting, I probably wouldn't be sitting at all.  I'd stay busy standing and moving around to do stuff until I collapsed into my bed.  I am that ODed on sitting.  Then Cassondra's MKAL started.  I'd already started standing to knit when, and if, my back felt stiff, but the idea of walking around while doing it seemed like a great way to add variety of movement to my day.  But it also seemed like it would be really hard.


First, the pattern called for 12 little balls of yarn from my stash.  12 color changes doesn't sound portable to me.  Secondly, I live in a place where I have to have my wits about me when walking or running outside.  People drive really fast around the curves and everyone has a loose pit bull to guard their crack.  I'm kidding.  I don't know that it's crack.
So, this pattern would have to be pretty easy to memorize if I were to set out walking with it, and that's just what it is.  Each section of color involves the same stitch pattern repeated for a time.  That time fits perfectly with a nice 45 minute walk. If I remember to alternate the direction in which I turn the project to do each side, the yarn doesn't tangle up with the wrap.  Each section only requires one or two of the little balls at a time.  So, I can toss them in a wrist handle bag, throw the growing scarf over my shoulder, walk out the door, and make a spectacle of myself.


I actually felt kind of inconspicuous.  It looked like I was walking with a little purse and I wasn't having to go super slow, either.  I was surprised that I got a few honks, since I wasn't even doing the splits, but whatever.

This is a funky little scarf, my friends.  It will be a fun wear in the winter.

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Kids Done Grown

I didn't want to title this post, using the dreaded nest reference.  You know the one.  I don't dread for it's meaning, just the overused cliched nature.  Also, I'm still dreaming that my kids are about the ages 5 and 1 on a regular basis, so that may mean I'm not completely cool with them being grown up.  However, after 25 years, I still haven't figured out what the recurring nightmare of waiting on a hundred tables at once at The Olive Garden means, so what do I know?

I do know that I love this guy and I am spending every second with him that I can this summer, without embarrassing him or cramping his style.  If that means re-watching Lost, including the dippy last season, then so be it.


(Total sidetone: It feels surreal to watch Lost and remember myself at the age I was when first watching it around the time of Hurricane Rita. Yes, the timeline of my adult life is defined by hurricanes and evacuations.  I was about the age of most of the cast and now realize I am so much older than they were then. And they are much older than they were then... and both of my kids are older and will not be living with me anymore...and now I'm rocking back and forth, with my head in my hands.)


Truly, I've made peace with the fact that my children are basically grown.  I feel so special to have been chosen to be their mother.  Not just any mother, but the mother of these, exact two people.  There's no one else like them.  I have known them since before they were born.  This guy liked to kick, a lot.  I remember doing a kickboxing aerobics class with him, in utero, and seeing the bulges of his little feet or hands kicking away inside of me.  He was either letting me know he was feisty too or else he was protesting the overly loud Hackers soundtrack the instructor repeatedly played.

I think he was feisty.  I remember that before he could walk, he would pull up into a standing position and then try to lift heavy things from off of the floor.  It wasn't like he could take them anywhere, he just wanted to see if he could do it.  There was a look of pure, concentrated joy on his face when he would pull at a cabinet door we had fixed with yet another child safety lock until it would pop open, bits of plastic and springs flying in different directions around him.


There was an almost maniacal mirth in his baby laugh that was super contagious.  I'd especially hear it when he was being chased and when he was the one chasing.  He was very tenderhearted about living things.  He couldn't handle Dances with Wolves because the wolf dies.  He couldn't handle March of the Penguins because two seconds into it, a penguin dies.  It took much convincing to get him to watch beyond the opening scene of Toy Story 2 because he just knew Buzz died.  Of course, this isn't the order these shows were introduced to him.  Just last month he tried to bend the prongs of the chain link fence between our yard and our next-door neighbor's downward so cats crossing over wouldn't get hurt.  Don't tell anyone, but he's a total softie.

I spoke in one of my podcast episodes about how proud I am of my son for accomplishing certain goals that he set for himself (with no pressure from us) while in high school.  He worked hard to get good grades and do the work on his own.  He also made Eagle Scout ranking in 3 years.  He did this without much help from me because I was in the unusual place of taking care of elderly family members.  It's not the titles he earned that I am proud of.  It is the way he went about earning them, while helping us at home and helping his great-grandparents.


So I won't say more about that here.  I want to show the senior photos I took, some of which are very stoic because he didn't yet have his braces off, and share with you some random memories of my boy:


Of not being able to nap for five minutes because he would get into something, somehow, in our over-the-top baby-proofed house.  I clearly remember the day I bolted upright after 3 minutes of desperate napping because it was too quiet, and found he'd left the room.  No, he'd left the house.  He was in the backyard with a Bowie knife, he wasn't supposed to know existed, from a cupboard too high for him to reach unless he climbed up the oven.  That sentence is dripping with "Bad Mom" implications.  If that wasn't enough, he then told me he was only trying to find snakes in the bushes.  Don't judge the weary mom.  I swear, it was absolutely the only dangerous thing left in our home for him to do.  I just never would have believed it was possible.  How could a toddler retain memory of a knife, and it's hiding place, they'd seen like once as a baby.  Needless to say, I never napped again. Ever.


He and his sister making a raft out of twigs and string they found while camping in the Smoky Mountains.  They spent hours following it down the creek by our camper, hopping from rock to rock, then picking it out of the water and doing it all over again.

How patiently he would sit on my lap as I read a story.  I didn't have to do lots of voices or use emphasis, though I always did, he was really into the story.

Every day he got to go to the library, he'd come home with reptile books.

I love that I have the evolution of his drawings from the first squiggles, to characters from Fullmetal Alchemist, to original drawings of people or imagined battle scenes.


How he would lay on the floor to watch Scooby Doo with his head on our big lab, Mo, as a pillow.

How much, as a small boy, he wanted me to play legos with him, yet he couldn't control his perfectionism about what he wanted to make.  So he slyly re-arranged whatever I built while trying to redirect my attention.  Similarly, he felt a need to oversee the battery usage of all of his battery-operated toys.  He rarely turned them on to conserve power and didn't like for us to.  (He is still a saver.)  I remember him trying to convince a group of friends that it was actually more fun to shoot toy laser guns without the sounds on and that searching for the nerf pellets after shooting them was the highlight of the game.


Sometimes, if he was rude or gruff, he would later come into the room and say he was sorry, all on his own.  He would say why he did it, and how he knew it must have made me feel and didn't want to do that anymore.  Of course, I wasn't going to hold it against him if he hadn't apologized, but I was often surprised by his self-awareness.  I mean, I don't know many adults who can apologize that way, in sincerity.

I remember how he and his sister could climb like monkeys up the rope that hung from a gigantic oak tree in one of our backyards, using only their arms. Then they'd flip upside down and take their hands off, using only the rope wrapped around a leg to hold on.

Once, as toddler we were driving and, from the backseat, he let me know where I stood in his estimation, "Mama, you're better'n a semi."  As in semi-trailer truck.  Still haven't made that "Better than a semi." t-shirt.

I remember when he finally outplayed his dad in video games.  I heard him, from the next room,  consoling my husband saying, "No, Daddy, you're not the worst at video games."

I adore the memory of the Christmas we scrimped to buy he and his sister a trampoline.  We sent them out to the garage to "get some gifts we said we'd accidentally left outside."  This was a ruse to get them to walk into the backyard and see their real gift.  They froze in place for a couple of seconds then grabbed each other tight, screaming, and jumping up and down.  It was the sweetest thing because they expected little that year.


Something we all enjoy is his rendition of how things happened.  It could be a memory of one of our vacations or something like an occurrence at school.  It will probably be exaggerated and from a wry perspective.  Whatever it is, we usually end up laughing, even when he's not trying for humor.

I can't draw big conclusions or say what life will be like if I only see him once a week for four years, then, maybe, less.  I can say some of what I am because of knowing him, though.  I have learned what I am capable of as he learned it too.  I saw the power in my words and deeds, as a mother.  It was humbling and scary at times.  Yet still, I began to relax about it, somehow.  There was unexpected confirmation that the love I give is good.  It's simple, but something I never truly believed before.


Just knowing someone and seeing them grow into who they were meant to be was enough for me.  But my thoughts were sometimes reflected, sometimes altered by this person, too.  I was first and foremost their mother, but I was also gaining clarity on who I had already been and who I would be.  I was learning about my God.  Hope burned brighter.  And that sense of of community, the most precious one, of people who knew you or were known by you, from the beginning, is my happiest place. Where small victories are won, where we laugh about things only we would laugh at, where we huddled together in prayer, and where we practiced a million mundane, precious daily rituals together.  Though I will miss his consistent presence, I know that I am left a more whole person for having had it in the first place.  So, I can't complain.

(more on flickr and instagram)

So, I'm a softie, too.  If you want more parental sentimentality, I looked up posts on my daughter before her graduation: outtakes, senior photos, and more motherly thoughts. And then just another...because.

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Episode 13: Stuffity Stuff Stuff

This is a lightweight title, though it's not an entirely lightweight episode.  So dig deep and answer the question at the top of the notes because it may be just the thing someone needs to hear.  Also, there will be STUFF for the Junko June and July Knit-along!  I know you don't require that, but it's happening all the same.



This is where I record the eleventy billionth knitting podcast.

On my blog: https://www.myso-calledhandmadelife.com
On Instagram as @mysocalledhandmadelife: https://www.instagram.com/mysocalledhandmadelife/
On Ravelry as mamatronic: https://www.ravelry.com/projects/mamatronic?set=&columns=&view=thumbnail&page=&sort=status%20completed_%20status_changed_&project_status_id=0&search=

My Question for you:  Have you recognized your wrong thinking?  How have you dealt with your wrong thinking?

Stuff I mention in Episode 13:

My Ravelry page, that I love: https://www.ravelry.com/projects/mamatronic?set=&columns=&view=thumbnail&page=&sort=status%20completed_%20status_changed_&project_status_id=0&search=

Ravelry Bundles?: https://www.ravelry.com/blog/200

My framed doily: https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjs4NEpHrit/?taken-by=mysocalledhandmadelife

with cheap Ikea Frames: https://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/00378403/

DIY caged pendants: https://www.instagram.com/p/BkX-Y39HEPc/?taken-by=mysocalledhandmadelife

meant to look like something from this site: https://www.barnlight.com

Giveaway prizes from Maker's Merch: https://www.etsy.com/shop/MakersMerch

and Lovebird Lane Yarns: https://www.etsy.com/shop/LovebirdLaneYarns

Michelle Colorway: https://www.etsy.com/listing/617657579/fangirl-collection-swindern-sock?ref=shop_home_active_6

#JunkoJuneandJuly: https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/junkojuneandjuly/

Junko Okamoto: https://www.ravelry.com/designers/junko-okamoto

Plum Sweater: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/plum-7

Elena by Moeke Yarns: http://www.moeke-yarns.com

helpful notes on Plum:

1) After ribbing is finished, remove markers at each side of neckline "v."
2) Section 5 set up round needs an increase on each side of the arms.

Bright by Junko Okamoto: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/bright-sweater

Rug by Junko Okamoto: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/rug-11

Igawa by Jinko Okamoto: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/igawa

Meg Sweater: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/meg-9

to be knit in Wool of the Andes Bouquet Heather: https://www.knitpicks.com/yarns/Wool_of_the_Andes_Worsted_Yarn__D5420103.html

Guthrie by Caitlyn Hunter: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/guthrie

Zida by Libby Jonson: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/zida

knit in Red Sock Blue Sock Yarn's Gentleman and Soft Romance: https://www.redsockbluesockyarn.com

Walking stuff:

Walk the Block MKAL: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/walk-the-block-mkal

I'm using magic knots now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nq_7EXTWHE

Minimal Shoes require a long transition time. Read much more about them: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00UW2F2IG/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

Some minimal brands like Soft Star: https://www.softstarshoes.com

Feelmax: https://feelmax.fi/shoes/

Vivobarefoot: https://www.vivobarefoot.com/us

Book and video recommendations:

Gretchen Rubin Happier Podcast: https://gretchenrubin.com/podcasts/

and her Happiness Project Book: https://gretchenrubin.com/books/the-happiness-project/about-the-book/

What I did to jumpstart my health:
-get 8-9 hours of sleep every night
-eat three healthy meals a day
-almost no sugar or caffeine
-set boundaries of what and when I would or would not do things
-recognized deeper, emotional stress from wrong thinking
-replaced the wrong thinking with right thinking (sounds so easy, right?) I used scripture.
- keep being creative through all of it






Saturday, June 30, 2018

I think I found my perfect oversized sweater.

I really wanted to write about graduation but my heart feels full, so I'm copping out with a sweater post instead.  This isn't just any sweater post, however.  It's a big, fat, Icelandic, image-dropping post.  And yes, that is a knitting needle you see hanging from my left sleeve.




Birch is one of a collection of beautiful, classic designs by Pam Allen in Plain and Simple Knits. It's one of those books from which I could knit anything and love it.  As much as I say "I love this" and "I absolutely love that" here, I can't say I love every pattern in many knitting books.  It is true of this one, though.



The yoke is excellent, but the combination of that and the oversized fit of the sample is what grabbed me.  I am in search of the perfect oversized, handmade sweater, you know.  In hopes of getting that My Closet-circa 1992-fit, I knit the third size.  This was another one of those commercial knits for the Commercial KAL that never even got entered into the KAL at all because I was really too busy to be knitting three sweaters at once.  However, just knowing the KAL existed, and it's purpose, was motivating.


I talked about how my plan to knit the sleeves en route to Iceland was a fail in Episode 10. In my haste to pack light, I left the yarn at home.  So these are not quite FO photos, but still memorable, taken by the Skaftafellj√∂kull (a glacier) in Skaftafell National Park.  So if you want to see this sweater with the sleeves, hop over to the podcast Episode 10 at about 42 minutes in.  Yes, I know.  I'm talky.


Details: I used size US 5 and 6 needles and Patons Classic Worsted in Moss Heather and Aran to knit a size 44.25" version of this.  I was surprised to find that my ten year old skein, mixed with new ones in the Moss Heather colorway didn't match.  So I actually alternated balls of Patons yarn. I wondered what level of hell this was.  Not worrying so much about dye lots is one of the joys of commercial yarn.  But, whatever, I did it all the way up to the yoke.  Then I just used one color of Moss Heather and the Aran colorway as the contrasting color.  When all was said and done, had I not started in my ancient ball of Moss Heather, I wouldn't have even needed it and could have chilled with all the alternating strands tangling up everywhere.


My only modification hardly counts as one.  I just picked up two extra stitches at the armhole gaps, one after the first 4 underarm stitches and one before the last 4.  These extra stitches were more like picking up the side of a stitch one row down.  I then decreased to get rid of them on the very next row.  This always works for the inevitable armhole holes.

There is an error in this pattern chart and it's a pretty big one.  Some of the books have been corrected, but mine was not.  It has taught me an important lesson: to check for errata before starting a pattern. If I had, this would've been an FO shot in Iceland instead of an In-Process photo.

The error were, firstly, that the main color and contrast color markings for the main chart are reversed.  So, You can see in the photo, below, how it didn't match up to the pattern sample.


It wasn't so bad on the first little colorwork section, but it didn't look good for the second one.  The second mistake was the omission of a 2 round CC border for that second colorwork section.  I have since looked for an acknowledgment of the errata online, but couldn't find it.  If you do knit this, just keep an eye on the sample in the book to make sure yours looks the same.

So I got to the second colorwork section before I realized the error.  I'm glad I compared it to the photo instead of just powering through.  I did see that another raveler reversed the MC and CC for a section too.  Ripping back and starting over cost me precious Icelandic sweater knitting time, but it all worked out okay.


Even with all the skein alternating and color variation, I love how this yoke turned out.  And I love it's roominess.
I know, for sure, that I will be knitting Larch one of these days.  Maybe for the Summer Sweater Knit-along.  Another Pam Allen knit I want to knit in Cotlin is Bobbie.  I'm sure you remember Edith and Paulina from the Home Collection, too.  So good!


(more on ravelry, instagram, kollabora, and flickr)

More about this sweater on podcast episodes 7- 10, especially episode 10.

Monday, June 25, 2018

Weekender

Somewhere between starting a podcast and my son finishing his senior year, I have gotten really behind on posting about my knitting projects. It stops today!!! 

I said that out loud. Could you tell?  I miss you, little blog, and all the bloggy friends. (Sidenote: autocorrect always changes bloggy to bloody.) So much has happened and I am sure I will back track with posts until readers are thoroughly confused about whether or not my son graduated high school or kindergarten and wether or not I am 29 or 44.  But, first I need to talk to you about something very important:


My Weekender sweater. :)  It didn't get a lot of attention once I finished it. I wore it during one freakishly cold weekend of DFW Fiber Fest (it was recognized and complimented a few times there.) then folded it, and shoved it in the armoire 'til next winter.  That is no indication of how I feel about it, though.

It was a good knit- a great knit, and perfect for that busy time in my life. I cast on before going to Peru. (A trip I haven't posted about here but it is discussed at length in Episode 5 of my podcast.)  I worked on it during the flight and finished it just before leaving for Iceland. Don't I sound worldly?  "Just before jetting off to Iceland..." I'd better enjoy dropping these exciting phrases now because, if the flooring specialists that came to my house earlier this week are correct, I will be spending all my extra money in the coming year or so on completely gutting and rebuilding the floors of our 100 year old home. Weeee!  Hurricanes can create excitement too. Apparently, I was due for a little of this.


Right, The Weekender. You know the pattern. Every single person with an instagram account has knit one. Seriously. And that Andrea Mowry! She makes my goal of slowing down on the pattern hoarding really difficult. If I knit only her patterns, I still don't think I could keep up with her output.   And I knit a lot, guys.  Remember the first year of her designing career, when she offered a giveaway for a year's worth of her patterns on instagram? (I can't believe I spent this much time looking for that photo on instagram- but it was cute!) Well, I was the winner. My Ravelry pattern count jumped substantially that day. I could not believe how much she created in a year!

When I saw this sweater, I knew it had to be mine. As in, Emotional Rescue. (click link and fast forward to 3:00.) I don't hear that with every pattern I choose. Just certain, special ones- like the Clarke Pullover. This was one of those.


Anyway, I knit this for the Stranded Podcast's Commercial KAL, where we used commercial yarn brands for our projects.  My commercial yarn was Cascade 220 in the Stonewash colorway, a very wearable, blue jean-like color. I did all three of the sweaters below in commercial yarn.  They're all completed and still haven't been talked about here...


..but, look, I did learn how to use the portrait feature on my phone for completely natural-looking photographs.


Details: I used size US 5s, I think, and knit the small size. My only modification was to pick up 4 extra stitches for each sleeve.


I wanted it to be a bit shorter than my other sweaters but not too cropped, so I added a little length.  I have a long torso, though.


Here's what I love: the fit, the knitting of it inside out, that slipped stitch down the front and back,


and those shoulders!


(more on ravelry, instagram, and flickr)

I am afraid some podcast viewers think I am really frugal and self disciplined with the yarn buying.  I am...getting there. But before I even started trying, I bought enough Patons Classic Worsted in a Dark Grey Marl for another one of these sweaters.  And it "will be mine, it will be mine, all mine..."

See this knit in other posts here and here.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Episode 12: Ravelry Member #187,412




This is where I record the eleventy billionth knitting podcast.

My question for you: What's the main thing that has jumped started your health after sickness, crisis, diagnosis, etc?

Stuff I mention in Episode 12: Ravelry Member #187,412

Zara Tee by Dianna Walla: http://www.myso-calledhandmadelife.com/2018/06/zara-tee.html

knit in Lindy Chain yarn: https://www.knitpicks.com/yarns/Lindy_Chain__D5420254.html

Mae by Andrea Mowry: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/mae-15

Fruity Knitting interview with Jess and Casey of Ravelry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qXmRsW-gPo

My Ravelry page: https://www.ravelry.com/people/mamatronic

My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mamatronic/albums

Konami code: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konami_Code

Truly Myrtle interview with Great Ocean Road Mill: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtT8LLX5ir4&t=3135s

Zida by Libby Jonson: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/zida

knit in Red Sock Blue Sock Yarns: https://www.redsockbluesockyarn.com

reusable produce bags: https://www.amazon.com/Reusable-Produce-Bags-Fruits-Veggies/dp/B002UXQ7QQ/ref=asc_df_B002UXQ7QQ/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=194842526382&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1564702605197586869&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9027872&hvtargid=pla-312440656941&psc=1

nutritious movement website with podcast, good blog posts, and book links: https://nutritiousmovement.com

my current read- Move Your DNA: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Move-Your-DNA-Restore-Movement/dp/1943370109/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1528952225&sr=1-1&keywords=move+your+dna+katy+bowman

Vivobarefoot shoes that you MUST transition into slowly: https://www.vivobarefoot.com/us

Walk The Block MKAL by Cassondra Rizzardi: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/walk-the-block-mkal

origami bag by Yarn Carnival: https://www.yarncarnival.com

Maker's Merch enamel pin: https://www.etsy.com/shop/MakersMerch

Ben Pobjoy's Democratic Movement interview: https://nutritiousmovement.com/walking-the-talk-podcast-episode-98/

Mobility Justice: https://nutritiousmovement.com/the-city-moves-you-podcast-episode-103/

Multicultural Communities for Mobility: http://www.multicultimobility.org/author/maria-sipin/

Article about homelessness in LA: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-homeless-how-we-got-here-20180201-story.html

The story of Adam and Eve and their shift of focus: https://www.bible.com/bible/111/GEN.3.niv

Our KAL - #JunkoJuneandJuly: https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/junkojuneandjuly/

Check out all of Junko's patterns: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/sources/junko-okamotos-ravelry-store/patterns

My sweater choice is Plum by Junko Okamoto: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/plum-7

knit in Moeke Yarn's Elena. Read their story here: http://www.moeke-yarns.com

Overdressed book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005GSZJ3Y/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

Article on Potato Chip News: https://gretchenrubin.com/2015/01/do-you-wish-you-spent-less-time-watching-potato-chip-news

The Attention Merchants by Tim Wu: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AEPSWB4/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1



Monday, June 4, 2018

Zara Tee

I am particularly proud of this tee that I knit for the Tops, Tanks, and Tees Knit-along.  It's Dianna Walla's Zara pattern and involved some things I've never done before.



I've never mixed crochet and knitting on a project. I've barely even crocheted anything, so this was very engaging. It really wasn't fiddly, either.


I've also never knit colorwork with linen/ cotton yarn. The windowpane style it created is a new addition to my wardrobe, too. I love it!

On top of all of that, I don't think I've ever knit an oversized summer top that was also cropped. I have only admired them on Ravelry, so it was nice to actually have my own.



And did I mention is is very appropriate for my climate?!?  I used Lindy Chain that washes well and is just a bit heavier than t-shirt jersey because, within a week or so, it will be so hot I will undergo a yearly ritual.  If you live in the Southern U.S. you may experience this same phenomenon.

It goes something like this, the details vary but the outcome is always the same:  You remember you have to bring a dish to some event, only hours before said event begins. After sweating over the stove for thirty minutes, you realize your are missing a key ingredient. You begin to feel flushed. You turn off the burners, rush to throw on shoes, spend 10 minutes looking for your keys, all the while a "Danger" warning flashing in your head. When you find them and are a mile from home, your tire goes completely flat. You are instantly drenched when you step out of the "Max AC" of your car to check out your tire. At this point your eyes are a more vibrant green than normal. Your husband, who always calls/ texts/ calls/ calls kids/ texts/ calls/texts/ calls kids again... until you answer his phone calls, won't pick up. It's ok. You're prepared. You had him oversee you changing a tire years ago on a Sunday afternoon, when your Uncle and Aunt drove by and looked puzzled as your husband sat in a lawn chair, chilling, while watching you lug a tire out of the trunk. You are ready for this. As you lift the spare from the trunk, you suddenly realize, truly realize, that it is hot. It's not just hot. It is so hot that you are practically cooking inside of your body. It is angry hot. Then the lug wrench won't budge and... oh just watch the clip!! Southern women, you know how this ends:



So I am trying to choose summer knits that won't cause me to freak out, with no warning to those around me, ripping the clothing from my flesh (except for purple capris) as I flip my car, you know?

Here are the details of this knit.  I said on my podcast that I was adding a one square repeat in length. Maybe I thought that I did, but I didn't.  Now that it is completed, I am glad I accidentally knit it at pattern's length because I really like the cropped shape.


Details:  I knit a size 45", using US 4 needles and 6 skeins of Lindy Chain in Black and 1 skein in Linen.  The linen was just scrap yarn. The pattern didn't require very much. For the crochet, I used hook size D.

Though linen is harder to find a knitting rhythm with, I think the cotton helps out and I didn't struggle too hard with this project.

Modifications: It is worked in pieces, and for some reason I knit one side a few rows longer than the other.  It must have been Senior Mom brain.  As in- my son is a senior and I am his mom.  I'm not quite a senior yet :) Anyway, when I realized I'd done this, I just used the longer side for the back. I laid the front on top of it and about 3/4 of an inch from the bottom of the front, I began the mattress stitching to join the sides.  This made a little split hem and hi/lo hem effect.  It's kind of cute.

That was unintentional; however, I purposely planned to make the sleeve opening deeper (6.5") and so picked up 8 extra stitches per sleeve. It fits perfectly.


Note:  I would do the applied crochet vertical lines on each side before seaming them together, as it is just easier to work from front to back on a piece of flat knitting.


Another thing I love about this top is that there is no I-cord edging, or finishing, to do to the sleeve and neckline edges.  This leaves little to drag your feet about, when finishing.


Even the ends weren't a big deal to me. I just wove them a bit away from the edges and tied them into a few knots, then snipped with about 3/4" remaining.  If there were two ends near each other, like at the side seams, I'd tie them together and repeat the knots and snipping. I have never had a problem with any of the summer knits I have handled this way unraveling or peeking through to the right side of the knit. So far, so good.

I wore this yesterday at high noon for these photos and, though it was hot, I didn't get heat angry. That's good because you wouldn't like me when I'm heat angry.

It's amazing how often I hear this theme music in the summer.

(image via Pinterest)

More on this knit on Ravelry, my podcast episodes 10-12 (I think), Kollabora, Flickr